Evaluation of Collaterals and Clot Burden Using Time-Resolved C-Arm Conebeam CT Angiography in the Angiography Suite: A Feasibility Study

Fellows’ Journal Club

Ten C-arm conebeam CT perfusion datasets from 10 subjects with acute ischemic stroke acquired before endovascular treatment were retrospectively processed to generate time-resolved conebeam CTA. From time-resolved conebeam CTA, 2 experienced readers evaluated the clot burden and collateral flow in consensus by using previously reported scoring systems and assessed the clinical value of this novel imaging technique. The 2 readers agreed that time-revolved C-arm conebeam CTA was the preferred method for evaluating the clot burden and collateral flow compared with other conventional imaging methods. They conclude that comprehensive evaluations of clot burden and collateral flow are feasible by using time-resolved C-arm conebeam CTA data acquired in the angiography suite.

Abstract

Figure 1 from paper
Coronal tMIP images (A left, B left, and C left) show a left ICA, a left M1, and an upper basilar trunk occlusion, respectively. The proximal and distal occlusion sites can be detected exactly from these images; this outcome enables the measurement of thrombus length in straight vessels. For the case with basilar tip occlusion, the thrombus distribution to the left P1 segment can be clearly seen (C, left); this feature can facilitate the thrombectomy planning for this case. These occlusions can also be detected by the volume-rendered time-resolved C-arm CBCTA images at the late venous phase (A, right) or early arterial phase (B, right and C, right). The sagittal tMIP image (D, left) shows an M2 occlusion at the bifurcation site, which was confirmed by a superselective injection through a microcatheter (D, right).

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

The assessment of collaterals and clot burden in patients with acute ischemic stroke provides important information about treatment options and clinical outcome. Time-resolved C-arm conebeam CT angiography has the potential to provide accurate and reliable evaluations of collaterals and clot burden in the angiographic suite. Experience with this technique is extremely limited, and feasibility studies are needed to validate this technique. Our purpose was to present such a feasibility study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Ten C-arm conebeam CT perfusion datasets from 10 subjects with acute ischemic stroke acquired before endovascular treatment were retrospectively processed to generate time-resolved conebeam CTA. From time-resolved conebeam CTA, 2 experienced readers evaluated the clot burden and collateral flow in consensus by using previously reported scoring systems and assessed the clinical value of this novel imaging technique independently. Interobserver agreement was analyzed by using the intraclass correlation analysis method.

RESULTS

Clot burden and collateral flow can be assessed by using the commonly accepted scoring systems for all eligible cases. Additional clinical information (eg, the quantitative dynamic information of collateral flow) can be obtained from this new imaging technique. Two readers agreed that time-revolved C-arm conebeam CTA is the preferred method for evaluating the clot burden and collateral flow compared with other conventional imaging methods.

CONCLUSIONS

Comprehensive evaluations of clot burden and collateral flow are feasible by using time-resolved C-arm conebeam CTA data acquired in the angiography suite. This technique further enriches the imaging tools in the angiography suite to enable a “one-stop- shop” imaging workflow for patients with acute ischemic stroke.

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Evaluation of Collaterals and Clot Burden Using Time-Resolved C-Arm Conebeam CT Angiography in the Angiography Suite: A Feasibility Study
jross
Jeffrey Ross • Mayo Clinic, Phoenix

Dr. Jeffrey S. Ross is a Professor of Radiology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and practices neuroradiology at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona. His publications include over 100 peer-reviewed articles, nearly 60 non-refereed articles, 33 book chapters, and 10 books. He was an AJNR Senior Editor from 2006-2015, is a member of the editorial board for 3 other journals, and a manuscript reviewer for 10 journals. He became Editor-in-Chief of the AJNR in July 2015. He received the Gold Medal Award from the ASSR in 2013.

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