Temporary Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization as a Treatment Option for Wide-Neck Aneurysms

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The authors intended to treat 33 aneurysms between January 2010 and December 2015 with temporary stent-assisted coiling, which formed the series for this study. Incidental and acutely ruptured aneurysms were included. Sufficient occlusion was achieved in 97.1% of the cases. In 94%, the stent could be fully recovered. Complications occurred in 5 patients (14.7%). They conclude that temporary stent-assisted coiling is an effective technique for the treatment of wide-neck aneurysms. Safety is comparable with that of stent-assisted coiling and coiling with balloon remodeling.

Abstract

Figure 1 from paper
A, An aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery before coiling. B, The same aneurysm partially coiled with a deployed Solitaire stent from the left A1 to the right A2 segment. C, The same aneurysm after complete coil embolization. The Solitaire stent has been recovered.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Simple coil embolization is often not a feasible treatment option in wide-neck aneurysms. Stent-assisted coil embolization helps stabilize the coils within the aneurysm. Permanent placement of a stent in an intracranial vessel, however, requires long-term platelet inhibition. Temporary stent-assisted coiling is an alternative technique for the treatment of wide-neck aneurysms. To date, only case reports and small case series have been published. Our purpose was to retrospectively analyze the effectiveness and safety of temporary stent-assisted coiling in a larger cohort.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Research was performed for all patients who had undergone endovascular aneurysm treatment in our institution (University Hospital Aachen) between January 2010 and December 2015. During this period, 355 consecutive patients had undergone endovascular aneurysm treatment. We intended to treat 33 (9.2%) of them with temporary stent-assisted coiling, and they were included in this study. Incidental and acutely ruptured aneurysms were included.

RESULTS

Sufficient occlusion was achieved in 97.1% of the cases. In 94%, the stent could be fully recovered. Complications occurred in 5 patients (14.7%), whereas in only 1 case was the complication seen as specific to stent-assisted coiling.

CONCLUSIONS

Temporary stent-assisted coiling is an effective technique for the treatment of wide-neck aneurysms. Safety is comparable with that of stent-assisted coiling and coiling with balloon remodeling.

 

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Temporary Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization as a Treatment Option for Wide-Neck Aneurysms
jross
Jeffrey Ross • Mayo Clinic, Phoenix

Dr. Jeffrey S. Ross is a Professor of Radiology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and practices neuroradiology at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona. His publications include over 100 peer-reviewed articles, nearly 60 non-refereed articles, 33 book chapters, and 10 books. He was an AJNR Senior Editor from 2006-2015, is a member of the editorial board for 3 other journals, and a manuscript reviewer for 10 journals. He became Editor-in-Chief of the AJNR in July 2015. He received the Gold Medal Award from the ASSR in 2013.

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