Multinodular and Vacuolating Neuronal Tumor of the Cerebrum: A New “Leave Me Alone” Lesion with a Characteristic Imaging Pattern

Fellows’ Journal Club

The most recent 2016 WHO classification includes MVNT as a unique cytoarchitectural pattern of gangliocytoma, though it remains unclear whether MVNT is a true neoplastic process or a dysplastic hamartomatous/malformative lesion. The authors report 33 cases of presumed multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumor of the cerebrum that exhibit a remarkably similar pattern of imaging findings consisting of a subcortical cluster of nodular lesions. They conclude that these are benign, nonaggressive lesions that do not require biopsy in asymptomatic patients and behave more like a malformative process than a true neoplasm.

Figure 6 from paper
MVNT typical presentation graphic illustration. Schematic coronal view depicts a nodular “bubbly-appearing” lesion located on the inner surface of otherwise normal-appearing left temporal lobe cortex within the deep cortical ribbon and superficial subcortical white matter. Reprinted from Osborn’s Brain9 with permission from Elsevier.

SUMMARY

Multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumor of the cerebrum is a recently reported benign, mixed glial neuronal lesion that is included in the 2016 updated World Health Organization classification of brain neoplasms as a unique cytoarchitectural pattern of gangliocytoma. We report 33 cases of presumed multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumor of the cerebrum that exhibit a remarkably similar pattern of imaging findings consisting of a subcortical cluster of nodular lesions located on the inner surface of an otherwise normal-appearing cortex, principally within the deep cortical ribbon and superficial subcortical white matter, which is hyperintense on FLAIR. Only 4 of our cases are biopsy-proven because most were asymptomatic and incidentally discovered. The remaining were followed for a minimum of 24 months (mean, 3 years) without interval change. We demonstrate that these are benign, nonaggressive lesions that do not require biopsy in asymptomatic patients and behave more like a malformative process than a true neoplasm.

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Multinodular and Vacuolating Neuronal Tumor of the Cerebrum: A New “Leave Me Alone” Lesion with a Characteristic Imaging Pattern
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jross
Jeffrey Ross • Mayo Clinic, Phoenix

Dr. Jeffrey S. Ross is a Professor of Radiology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and practices neuroradiology at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona. His publications include over 100 peer-reviewed articles, nearly 60 non-refereed articles, 33 book chapters, and 10 books. He was an AJNR Senior Editor from 2006-2015, is a member of the editorial board for 3 other journals, and a manuscript reviewer for 10 journals. He became Editor-in-Chief of the AJNR in July 2015. He received the Gold Medal Award from the ASSR in 2013.

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