Do Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Vascular Hyperintensities Represent Good Collaterals before Reperfusion Therapy?

Fellows’ Journal Club

The authors evaluated 244 consecutive patients eligible for reperfusion therapy with MCA stroke and pretreatment MR imaging with both FLAIR and PWI. The FLAIR vascular hyperintensity score was based on ASPECTS, ranging from 0 (no FLAIR vascular hyperintensity) to 7 (FLAIR vascular hyperintensities abutting all ASPECTS cortical areas). The hypoperfusion intensity ratio was defined as the ratio of the time-to-maximum >10-second over time-to-maximum >6-second lesion volumes. The FLAIR vascular hyperintensities were more extensive in patients with good collaterals than those with poor collaterals. The FLAIR vascular hyperintensity score was independently associated with good collaterals. They conclude that the ASPECTS assessment of FLAIR vascular hyperintensities could be used to rapidly identify patients more likely to benefit from reperfusion therapy.

Abstract

Figure 2 from paper
Few FVHs and high hypoperfusion intensity ratio. MR imaging obtained 180 minutes after stroke onset (NIHSS score = 12) in a 56-year-old man. A, FVHs in the insula, corresponding to a 1-point FVH score. B, Ninety-four milliliter diffusion-weighted imaging lesion. Tmax map (C) with 91-mL Tmax >6-second lesion and 53-mL Tmax >10-second lesion (D) (HIR = 0.58). After intravenous thrombolysis, the 24-hour NIHSS score was 14, and the DWI lesion was 150 mL (not shown). The 3-month mRS was 3.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

In acute ischemic stroke, whether FLAIR vascular hyperintensities represent good or poor collaterals remains controversial. We hypothesized that extensive FLAIR vascular hyperintensities correspond to good collaterals, as indirectly assessed by the hypoperfusion intensity ratio.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We included 244 consecutive patients eligible for reperfusion therapy with MCA stroke and pretreatment MR imaging with both FLAIR and PWI. The FLAIR vascular hyperintensity score was based on ASPECTS, ranging from 0 (no FLAIR vascular hyperintensity) to 7 (FLAIR vascular hyperintensities abutting all ASPECTS cortical areas). The hypoperfusion intensity ratio was defined as the ratio of the time-to-maximum >10-second over time-to-maximum >6-second lesion volumes. The median hypoperfusion intensity ratio was used to dichotomize good (low hypoperfusion intensity ratio) versus poor (high hypoperfusion intensity ratio) collaterals. We then studied the association between FLAIR vascular hyperintensity extent and hypoperfusion intensity ratio.

RESULTS

Hypoperfusion was present in all patients, with a median hypoperfusion intensity ratio of 0.35 (interquartile range, 0.19–0.48). The median FLAIR vascular hyperintensity score was 4 (interquartile range, 3–5). The FLAIR vascular hyperintensities were more extensive in patients with good collaterals (hypoperfusion intensity ratio ≤0.35) than with poor collaterals (hypoperfusion intensity ratio >0.35; P for Trend = .016). The FLAIR vascular hyperintensity score was independently associated with good collaterals (P for Trend = .002).

CONCLUSIONS

In patients eligible for reperfusion therapy, FLAIR vascular hyperintensity extent was associated with good collaterals, as assessed by the pretreatment hypoperfusion intensity ratio. The ASPECTS assessment of FLAIR vascular hyperintensities could be used to rapidly identify patients more likely to benefit from reperfusion therapy.

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Do Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Vascular Hyperintensities Represent Good Collaterals before Reperfusion Therapy?
jross
Jeffrey Ross • Mayo Clinic, Phoenix

Dr. Jeffrey S. Ross is a Professor of Radiology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, and practices neuroradiology at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona. His publications include over 100 peer-reviewed articles, nearly 60 non-refereed articles, 33 book chapters, and 10 books. He was an AJNR Senior Editor from 2006-2015, is a member of the editorial board for 3 other journals, and a manuscript reviewer for 10 journals. He became Editor-in-Chief of the AJNR in July 2015. He received the Gold Medal Award from the ASSR in 2013.

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