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Book Reviews • American Journal of Neuroradiology

Beginning with the January 2009 issue, all book reviews that have been published in the American Journal of Neuroradiology are now available on AJNR Blog. As of January 2010, book reviews are a blog-only feature and no longer appear in the print or online versions of the AJNR.

Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis, 2nd Edition

Federle MP, Rosado-de-Christenson ML, Raman SP, Carter BW, Woodward PJ, Shaaban AM. Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis. 2nd ed. Elsevier; 2016; 1192 pp; $329.99

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For anyone predominantly or exclusively involved in neuroradiology, having a high-quality, well-illustrated, and readily available text covering the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is desirable. Those parts of the body have a nasty way of occasionally making the interpretations of spine imaging more difficult. Enter the second edition of Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis (2017), published by Elsevier and edited by Drs. Federle, Rosado-de-Christenson, Raman, Carter, Woodward, and Shaaban. As with all the books in this series, the drawings, the imaging, and the bullet point written material in this hardcover book is outstanding in quality.

The chest section is divided into 16 chapters, the abdomen into 17 chapters, and the pelvis into 8 chapters. The emphasis throughout, as the title implies, is on anatomy; however, in some sections (e.g., in the abdomen) there is more pathologic imaging than in others. Nearly all of the material is pertinent to our interpretation of spine imaging when large fields of view are included (or even if the FOVs are narrow). Nowhere is this more pertinent than when viewing thoracic lumbar spine imaging (CTs in particular) and analyzing the abdominal contents when required. Here would be a ready reference to help resolve questions related to anatomy and pathology incidentally seen on neuroimaging. The same can be said for the imaging of the pelvis. Here (as in the entire book) the illustrations of the anatomy are outstanding. These help to further one’s appreciation of the accompanying CT anatomy, although MR and US are included to a lesser extent. There are areas that will not be troublesome when viewing spine or lumbosacral plexus studies, such as detailed imaging anatomy of the heart …

Neuroimaging Clinics of North America: Pediatric Brain Tumors Update

Brandão LA, ed. Mukherji SK, consulting ed. Neuroimaging Clinics of North America: Pediatric Brain Tumors Update. Elsevier; 2017;27(1):1–194; $365.00

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As a follow-up to the last issue (November 2016) of the Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, which dealt with adult brain tumors, the current issue, also edited by Dr. Lara Brandão, concerns an update on pediatric brain tumors. One hundred and ninety-four pages in length, the material covers not only standard imaging/findings in pediatric tumors, but also importantly includes advanced techniques both in the initial patient assessment and in posttherapy evaluation. The nine chapters of this issue are: posterior fossa tumors; supratentorial tumors; neonatal brain tumors; pineal region masses; sella and the parasellar region rumors; extraparenchymal lesions; tumors and tumor-like masses that involve multiple spaces; peptide-based vaccine therapies; and advanced MR imaging/clinical applications. For the seasoned neuroradiologist, the last two chapters will be of greatest interest; however, the entire volume addresses key imaging points in a wide spectrum of neoplastic brain disorders. Dr. Brandão has done a remarkable job (similar to the editorship of the prior volume) getting the 24 authors to contribute their experiences and expertise to this important issue. If one is not a Neuroimaging Clinics of North America subscriber, then this single issue is a recommended purchase for one’s personal collection or for a departmental library.…

Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Brain and Meninges, Spine, and Head and Neck

Meyers SP. Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Brain and Meninges. Thieme; 2016; 652 pp; 1713 ill; $179.99

Meyers SP. Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Spine. Thieme; 2016; 288 pp; 309 ill; $149.99

Meyers SP. Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Head and Neck. Thieme; 2016; 664 pp; 1538 ill; $179.99

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With an unprecedented trifecta, Dr. Steven Meyers from the University of Rochester Medical Center has single-handedly authored and simultaneously published 3 books: Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Brain and Meninges (652 pages), Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Spine (288 pages), and Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Head and Neck (664 pages). The set up in each book is similar and follows the same format, which in turn adds to the appeal of these 3 publications.

Each book has a short introduction related to anatomy and/or development, and in some areas there are short descriptions of anatomy and function that precede specific material. Pathological cases are presented in well-defined sections, each containing abundant and well-chosen images that are combined with tables that list each disease and adjacent to columns containing findings and comments on the disease under consideration. This is not a common way of presenting material; however, it is effective, allowing a substantial amount of material to be discussed in a compact space. It also allows a nice separation of imaging findings from other important clinical and pathologic information. I do find it amazing that Dr. Meyers was able to obtain all of these images from his own files and collate them so completely.

The chapters in Brain are: congenital malformations; supratentorial intra-axial lesions; infratentrial intra-axial lesions; multiple lesions; white matter lesions and diffuse lesions in children; lesions of the basal ganglia; neurodegenerative disorders; ischemia/infarction in adults; ischemia/infarction in children; intra- and parasellar lesions; and pineal region lesions. The chapters in Spine are: congenital/development; …

General and Vascular Ultrasound: Case Review, 3rd Edition

McGahan JP, Teefey SA, Needleman L. General and Vascular Ultrasound: Case Review. 3rd ed. Elsevier; 2016; 376 pp; 800 ill; $59.99

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The third edition of General and Vascular Ultrasound: Case Review Series (2016) by John McGahan, Sharlene Teefey, and Laurence Needleman is an update to this classic series that has helped generations of radiology residents on their paths toward board certification. While the format of the new board exam is different, these cases of varying difficulty are no less relevant than they were when we all traveled to Louisville.

A total of 127 cases are categorized as Opening Round, Fair Game, and Challenge cases. As has historically been the case, Opening Round is a great warm-up for those basic cases that should be seen early in residency, Fair Game cases offer a good review for more senior residents, and Challenge cases give upper-level residents a run for their money. Even for general radiologists in practice, reviewing all of these cases can help individuals recall forgotten tidbits of knowledge about common cases we see fairly frequently. Approaching each case as an unknown is not only entertaining, but brings back mostly fond (and some not-so-fond) memories of countless hours of boards preparation.

Each case begins with an image, a brief history, and 4 multiple choice questions about the image. The subsequent page gives the diagnosis, the answer to the questions, and a commentary which varies in format depending on the case. Cross references to The Requisites series rounds out the case, along with acknowledgments where appropriate. The images are good and a section of supplemental images is a nice addition to round out the review of each case.

I continue to highly recommend the Case Review Series, including this book, to residents studying on rotation and preparing for the boards. The …

Books Received, March 2017

Neuro-Developmental Treatment: A Guide to NDT Clinical Practice
Judith C. Bierman, Mary Rose Franjoine, Cathy M. Hazzard, Janet M. Howle, Marcia Stamer (Authors)
Thieme; 2016; 688 pages; 339 illustrations; $79.99

The Greenberg Rapid Review: A Companion to the 8th Edition
Leonard I. Kranzler, Jonathan G. Hobbs (Authors)
Thieme; 2016; 1650 pages; 150 illustrations; $109.99…

RadCases: Ultrasound Imaging

Azar N, Donaldson CK. RadCases: Ultrasound Imaging. Thieme; 2015; 224 pp; 460 ill; $59.99

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RadCases: Ultrasound Imaging by Nami Azar and Carolyn K. Donaldson was published by Thieme in 2015 and is part of the RadCases series edited by Jonathan Lorenz and Hector Ferral. This book fits in well with the RadCases series as a case-based review of ultrasound cases, which includes common and unusual diseases and demonstrates how they appear on ultrasound, with supplemental cross-sectional images in some cases. The hardcover includes 100 cases plus a scratch-off code that allows the purchaser to access all 100 cases and an additional 150 cases online for 1 year.

Cases are presented in a random fashion with respect to topic, just as cases may be read in practice. Thus, a gallbladder case may be followed by a thyroid case, then a kidney case, and then a scrotal case. One drawback to this format is that it hinders focused studying of 1 topic area at a time. A benefit is that it is a more realistic format and facilitates the presentation of each case as an unknown. Each case begins with 1 or more ultrasound images and a brief clinical presentation. Further workup images and sometimes cross-sectional images are shown on the same page. When the page is turned, the second page summarizes the imaging findings with an annotated description. A differential diagnosis is given with the correct disease in bold print. A brief section on essential facts and pearls and pitfalls follows. Each of these sections is written in brief bullet points.

The cases are a nice mix of complex and basic cases. Topics are reviewed succinctly but effectively. Image quality is very good and the images are practical, reflecting what might be encountered in clinical practice. There is a nice …

Nerve Surgery

Mackinnon SE. Nerve Surgery. Thieme; 2015; 645 pp; 879 ill; $299.99

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Dr. Susan Mackinnon is a world-renowned expert in all aspects of peripheral nerve injury and repair, from basic science to surgery and clinical treatment to clinical discovery. She has served as Professor and Chair of Plastic Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine for almost two decades.

As an author of more than 500 articles in numerous areas of nerve injury and repair, she is likely best known for her work on the development of nerve allograft repair with immunosuppression, the understanding of tubular nerve repair strategies, and more recently, nerve transfers. She co-authored a book with Lee Dellon in the late 80s on peripheral nerve surgery, and the current textbook, now almost 30 years later, is a much-needed update on and advance in the field.

The book is organized into sections, going from basic science and anatomy and physiology of nerve repair to the concept of nerve grafting. As opposed to the previous text, there is a real focus on nerve transfers, a relatively new area of peripheral nerve surgery. The text is extremely well-organized and of enormous value as a reference text for any practitioner involved in nerve repair.

The neuroradiology aspects of this book are relatively minor and limited—mostly to images of tumors of the peripheral nervous system. The area of imaging of nerve injuries is really a sub-subspecialty within this field of neuroradiology and is essentially not covered in this text.

The text does cover many of the surgical aspects of peripheral nerve repair, including (but not limited to) direct nerve repair, nerve graft, and nerve transfers. It includes entrapment neuropathies as well as tendon transfers for functional recovery.

The images are excellent and clearly labeled. Only a few are taken from the original …

Neuroimaging Clinics of North America: Adult Brain Tumors

Brandão LA, ed. Mukherji SK, consulting ed. Neuroimaging Clinics of North America: Adult Brain Tumors. Elsevier; 2016;26(4):493–694; $360.00

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This November 2016 issue of the Neuroimaging Clinics of North America consists of 9 chapters (nearly 200 pages in length) and covers a number of aspects of adult brain tumors. Edited by Dr. Lara Brandão with contributions from 21 international and national authors, this volume deals with (in order): posterior fossa tumors, lymphomas (2 chapters), the pre- and posttreatment evaluation of gliomas (2 chapters), metastasis, extra parenchymal tumors, advanced MR techniques, and interesting cases of pseudotumors. It is a bit surprising that there is not a chapter dedicated to the emerging brain tumor classifications based on molecular/genetic factors. While in our daily readings of brain MRs and CTs, we do not consider these molecular factors, these issues are discussed among members of neuro-oncology tumor boards, on which neuroradiologists are participants. With the increased emphasis on ICD types and their implications for therapy, some space on this subject is warranted. Had this been included, some of the terminology used elsewhere in the book might have been altered. Of course, the chapter on posttreatment of gliomas and the complexities in the analysis of such patients will be of great interest to the readers of this volume. The extensive material on lymphomas is important and noteworthy because of the increased incidence of disease and the multiple parameters that can be utilized in its detection and evaluation. Many important teaching points are raised in this 54-page (2-chapter) evaluation of lymphomas.

The images included in this volume are of high quality and are well-described, with important structural changes in brain tumors included. Even if one does not read the volume cover-to-cover, one can derive an understanding (providing a good review) of adult brain tumors and see …

Temporal Bone Dissection Guide, 2nd Edition

Francis HW, Niparko JK. Temporal Bone Dissection Guide. 2nd ed. Thieme; 2016; 96 pp; 165 ill; $89.99

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The second edition of Temporal Bone Dissection Guide provides an excellent foundation for mastering temporal bone anatomy as well as otologic and neurotologic surgical procedures through a well-organized presentation of essential temporal bone anatomy and its clinical application in temporal bone surgery. The authors’ systematic approach to the presentation of the material parallels the progression of knowledge acquisition and skill development among otolaryngology residents and neurotology fellows-in-training. Following a well-emphasized discussion on the proper use of the operating microscope and otologic instruments, including suction/irrigation and high-speed drills, the authors describe temporal bone surface anatomy and the fundamentals of performing a successful and safe mastoidectomy before proceeding to discuss deeper, more complex anatomic features and mastery of anatomic landmarks in lateral skull base procedures. The second edition has also added a section on endoscopic middle ear dissection, which has become an essential component in mastering otologic surgical technique. Furthermore, this edition has expanded the description of techniques for infratemporal and extended middle fossa dissection.

The text of the dissection manual provides easy-to-follow, fundamental information that is supplemented with well-labeled illustrations, histologic slides, and radiographic images, as well as current references with suggested reading. Furthermore, included with the purchase of the dissection manual is access to online videos of cadaveric and intraoperative temporal bone dissection with narration by the contributing authors. A potential limitation of the manual is that it does not provide images of cadaveric or intraoperative temporal bone dissection, which could help readers further hone their understanding of the complex 3D anatomy.

The accurate and concise information presented in the dissection manual reflects the cumulative surgical and teaching experience of the contributing authors. Although several temporal bone dissection manuals have been published …

Pediatric Radiology: The Requisites, 4th Edition

Walters MM, Robertson RL. Pediatric Radiology: The Requisites. 4th ed. Elsevier; 2016; 432 pp; 1200 ill; $109.99

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The 4th edition of Pediatric Radiology, edited by Drs. Walters and Robertson, along with 21 other contributors, covers the field of pediatric radiology in 420 pages. Of course, in a book this short that attempts to address a large subspecialty, only the highlights of every area can be covered. This is the overall intent of the book—to provide a foundation in pediatric radiology upon which one can build. The neuroradiology portion of the book is reserved for the last 3 chapters (brain, spine, head and neck) and includes 144 pages. For a seasoned neuroradiologist, there are certainly other texts that are more inclusive; however, for a resident or fellow beginning a rotation in pediatric radiology or in neuroradiology, this is a solid introduction to the field. The images are crisp and each chapter summarizes the key elements.

Brain: congenital anomalies; neurocutaneous syndrome; hydrocephalus infections/inflammation; tumors; vascular disease and vascular anomalies; trauma; metabolic disease

Spine: developmental abnormalities; vascular abnormalities; trauma infection; inflammation; tumors

Head and Neck: congenital and developmental abnormalities (including orbits, nasal cavity, face, temporal bone, neck/oral cavity); trauma; infection/inflammatory conditions; tumors

For those who do not practice or observe much pediatric neuroradiology, these 3 chapters provide a wonderful summary, and the last chapter in particular allows one to evaluate and read about abnormalities that are infrequently encountered.

This book is recommended for any radiology library, whether in a private or academic practice. Neuroradiologists will not consider this a primary personal purchase.…