Full Reviews

Vertigo and Disequilibrium: A Practical Guide to Diagnosis and Management, 2nd Edition

Weber PC. Vertigo and Disequilibrium: A Practical Guide to Diagnosis and Management. 2nd ed. Thieme; 2016; 248 pp; 167 ill; $129.99

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The second edition of Vertigo and Disequilibrium: A Practical Guide to Diagnosis and Management, authored and edited by Dr. Peter C. Weber, takes on the challenging task of summarizing the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of the various etiologies of vertigo and disequilibrium in a mere 230 pages. Although vertigo and disequilibrium are relatively common complaints, their work-up is a daunting and intimidating task for most physicians. Dr. Weber describes the vestibular system as a poorly understood “black box” because of limited exposure to its anatomy and pathophysiology during medical school and residency training. This book successfully addresses common misunderstandings and lays out a systematic approach to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of various etiologies accounting for vertigo and disequilibrium. The chapters are short, concise, clear, well-written, well-organized, and supplemented with helpful figures and tables, as well as updated references for more in-depth reading. The book ends with an appendix of practical frequently asked questions, which would be of use to both physicians and patients alike. The supplemental online videos, which have been expanded from the first edition, provide examples of common procedures, treatment maneuvers, physical examination techniques, and signs.

The first 6 chapters lay the groundwork for the rest of the book by succinctly summarizing important aspects of the medical history, physical examination, computerized testing, radiology work-up, anatomy, physiology, and laboratory testing in patients with vertigo and disequilibrium. At the beginning of Chapter 1, Dr. Weber stresses the paramount importance of a medical history: “The diagnosis of a patient with vertigo or dizziness can almost always be ascertained 80% of the time by taking an accurate history.” In the very first paragraph of the book, the author …

Spine Surgery: Tricks of the Trade, 3rd Edition

Vaccaro AR, Albert TJ, eds. Spine Surgery: Tricks of the Trade. 3rd ed. Thieme; 2016; 462 pp; 400 ill; $199.99

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Summarizing and organizing all aspects of spine surgery is a daunting and arduous task. The spinal column can provide a variety of pathology to the surgeon while offering particular vulnerability in the trauma setting, necessitating urgent or emergent attention. This text is authored by 2 of the most reputable spine surgeons in the world, which offers the reader some confidence as they navigate through the chapters. The other contributors are also recognized as experts in the subject category they are describing.

The text consists of 21 distinct sections providing organization and appropriate categorization of all aspects of spine surgery. Within these 21 sections, 112 chapters highlight the finer details of each topic and procedure. The chapters are each very easy to read and understand, no matter the level of one’s training or discipline. These chapters are all structured with a similar foundation and schematic so that the readers of this text can anticipate the areas of focus from page to page.  Uniformly, each of the 112 chapters includes a description of the procedure discussed, indications/contraindications, and special considerations. Each also highlights key procedural steps and shares the experiences of other surgeons to help avoid pitfalls and ensure technical completion of the surgical objective.

As an owner of both the second and third editions, I can personally attest to the quality improvements of this resource. Color illustrations, charts, and photographs are featured in every chapter, as opposed to only black and white pictures in the previous edition. Moreover, this edition provides online access to a multitude of videos that demonstrate the technical aspects of these operations, which were filmed in the operating room or on cadavers. Furthermore, the scope of …

MCQ Based Review of Neuroradiology-Update, Category–Brain, 500 MCQs For ABR Core, Certifying and CAQ Exams

Takhtani D. MCQ Based Review of Neuroradiology-Update. iTunes; 2015; 636 pp and ill; $12.99

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MCQ Based Review of Neuroradiology is an innovative collection of 500 multiple choice questions (MCQs) dealing with a wide variety of subjects including pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging, and physics. It is intended as a review for radiologists in training planning to take their core, certifying, or CAQ examinations or for practicing radiologists who desire a case- and question-based neuroradiology review.

The questions are divided into 3 groups based on difficulty level. Each chapter begins with a series of images followed by several MCQs and finally by answer pages that cover the main topic and ancillary information. The images are of high quality and are well annotated, the questions are clear and well thought out, and the articles are well-written and provide reliable and up-to-date information. Furthermore, the book is incredibly interactive. Most of the terms are linked to the Internet and to other parts of the book, you can search within the book, highlight, add notes, and even listen to the text.

Having recently taken the ABR’s Core Examination, I can attest to the usefulness of this book in preparing for the new exam format. Particularly in the area of physics as it pertains to neuroradiology, this book presents practical and clinically relevant scenarios that come up in everyday practice and the explanations are coherent and easy to follow.

In summary, in this increasingly digital world, this book has many features that make it a very dynamic and interactive learning experience, and is a valuable educational tool for any radiologist desiring to sharpen their diagnostic abilities in neuroimaging.…

Interventional Oncology: Principles and Practice of Image-Guided Cancer Therapy, 2nd Edition

Geschwind J-F, Soulen MC, eds. Interventional Oncology: Principles and Practice of Image-Guided Cancer Therapy. 2nd ed. Cambridge Medicine; 2016; 346 pp; 94 ill; $199.00

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Interventional oncology (IO) is a rapidly advancing and ever-changing field. So important has IO become in the treatment of patients with cancer that it is the fourth pillar of cancer care, with the traditional 3 being surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.1 Diagnostic and interventional radiologists both play important roles in the clinical evaluation of patients and participate in multidisciplinary tumor boards. Participation in these boards is a must for the diagnostic and interventional radiologist alike. It is no longer sufficient for radiologist to merely show images and perform anatomic measurements of tumor response; rather, a thorough understanding of the disease process and multidisciplinary therapeutic options is required to add true value to the discussion.

Traditionally, IO has been thought of in the narrow scope of liver-directed therapy, such as that for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver-predominant colorectal metastases. Now, IO encompasses bone ablation, prostate ablation, treatment of lung cancer, primary and adjunctive treatment of renal cell carcinoma, and a host of palliative care procedures.

This book showcases the breadth of pathology and the wide-ranging tools that interventional radiology and IO have at their disposal to treat patients with cancer. Specialists from around the world have contributed and authors are the definitive authorities on their topics (e.g., Riccardo Lencioni authors the chapter on the assessment and triage of hepatocellular carcinoma, and Peter Mueller and Debra Gervais author the chapter on the management of small renal masses).

Organized into a total of 10 sections, this book first discusses principles behind therapies (e.g., how Y-90 or radiofrequency ablation works) and then discusses specific modalities for the treatment of specific diseases (e.g., Y-90 for colorectal liver metastases and ablation …

Neurosurgical Operative Atlas: Spine and Peripheral Nerves, 3rd Edition

Wolfla CE, Resnick DK. Neurosurgical Operative Atlas: Spine and Peripheral Nerves. 3rd ed. Thieme; 2016; 546 pp; 874 ill; $269.99

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Neurosurgical Operative Atlas is a comprehensive tutorial on current spinal and peripheral nerve surgery written by a group of authors mainly from the world of neurosurgery. The sections covering surgery of the spine give a comprehensive overview of topics such as decompression, instrumentation, and fusion. Further specialty topics such as tumor excisions and vascular malformations are also covered. The section on peripheral nerves mainly covers surgical treatment of upper and lower extremity nerve compression syndromes, as well as treatments of brachial plexus injuries.

The organizational structure, teaching value, and accuracy of the information presented is a strength of this book. Each chapter is organized into sections discussing indications for treatment, patient selection, treatment options, and preoperative planning for various procedures. The subjects are comprehensively covered without getting mired in the minutiae of various pathologies and concepts. It can serve as both a reference and a primary guide for reviewing operative techniques; hence, as a teaching text, it is quite useful. The accuracy of the information presented is as expected for a textbook published with the support of a reputable organization such as the American Association for Neurological Surgeons. The references cited in every chapter are invariably from peer-reviewed journals and leading textbooks in the various disciplines of surgery covered.

The images and illustrations presented in this text are of excellent quality. The illustrations are not always as visually appealing as those that can be found in other texts, but they serve as a strong supplement to the written portions. The greatest strength of this book, however, is the generally outstanding series of intraoperative images provided. The editors and authors have managed to acquire images of great quality, which is …

Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis, 2nd Edition

Federle MP, Rosado-de-Christenson ML, Raman SP, Carter BW, Woodward PJ, Shaaban AM. Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis. 2nd ed. Elsevier; 2016; 1192 pp; $329.99

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For anyone predominantly or exclusively involved in neuroradiology, having a high-quality, well-illustrated, and readily available text covering the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is desirable. Those parts of the body have a nasty way of occasionally making the interpretations of spine imaging more difficult. Enter the second edition of Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis (2017), published by Elsevier and edited by Drs. Federle, Rosado-de-Christenson, Raman, Carter, Woodward, and Shaaban. As with all the books in this series, the drawings, the imaging, and the bullet point written material in this hardcover book is outstanding in quality.

The chest section is divided into 16 chapters, the abdomen into 17 chapters, and the pelvis into 8 chapters. The emphasis throughout, as the title implies, is on anatomy; however, in some sections (e.g., in the abdomen) there is more pathologic imaging than in others. Nearly all of the material is pertinent to our interpretation of spine imaging when large fields of view are included (or even if the FOVs are narrow). Nowhere is this more pertinent than when viewing thoracic lumbar spine imaging (CTs in particular) and analyzing the abdominal contents when required. Here would be a ready reference to help resolve questions related to anatomy and pathology incidentally seen on neuroimaging. The same can be said for the imaging of the pelvis. Here (as in the entire book) the illustrations of the anatomy are outstanding. These help to further one’s appreciation of the accompanying CT anatomy, although MR and US are included to a lesser extent. There are areas that will not be troublesome when viewing spine or lumbosacral plexus studies, such as detailed imaging anatomy of the heart …

Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Brain and Meninges, Spine, and Head and Neck

Meyers SP. Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Brain and Meninges. Thieme; 2016; 652 pp; 1713 ill; $179.99

Meyers SP. Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Spine. Thieme; 2016; 288 pp; 309 ill; $149.99

Meyers SP. Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Head and Neck. Thieme; 2016; 664 pp; 1538 ill; $179.99

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With an unprecedented trifecta, Dr. Steven Meyers from the University of Rochester Medical Center has single-handedly authored and simultaneously published 3 books: Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Brain and Meninges (652 pages), Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Spine (288 pages), and Differential Diagnosis in Neuroimaging: Head and Neck (664 pages). The set up in each book is similar and follows the same format, which in turn adds to the appeal of these 3 publications.

Each book has a short introduction related to anatomy and/or development, and in some areas there are short descriptions of anatomy and function that precede specific material. Pathological cases are presented in well-defined sections, each containing abundant and well-chosen images that are combined with tables that list each disease and adjacent to columns containing findings and comments on the disease under consideration. This is not a common way of presenting material; however, it is effective, allowing a substantial amount of material to be discussed in a compact space. It also allows a nice separation of imaging findings from other important clinical and pathologic information. I do find it amazing that Dr. Meyers was able to obtain all of these images from his own files and collate them so completely.

The chapters in Brain are: congenital malformations; supratentorial intra-axial lesions; infratentrial intra-axial lesions; multiple lesions; white matter lesions and diffuse lesions in children; lesions of the basal ganglia; neurodegenerative disorders; ischemia/infarction in adults; ischemia/infarction in children; intra- and parasellar lesions; and pineal region lesions. The chapters in Spine are: congenital/development; …

General and Vascular Ultrasound: Case Review, 3rd Edition

McGahan JP, Teefey SA, Needleman L. General and Vascular Ultrasound: Case Review. 3rd ed. Elsevier; 2016; 376 pp; 800 ill; $59.99

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The third edition of General and Vascular Ultrasound: Case Review Series (2016) by John McGahan, Sharlene Teefey, and Laurence Needleman is an update to this classic series that has helped generations of radiology residents on their paths toward board certification. While the format of the new board exam is different, these cases of varying difficulty are no less relevant than they were when we all traveled to Louisville.

A total of 127 cases are categorized as Opening Round, Fair Game, and Challenge cases. As has historically been the case, Opening Round is a great warm-up for those basic cases that should be seen early in residency, Fair Game cases offer a good review for more senior residents, and Challenge cases give upper-level residents a run for their money. Even for general radiologists in practice, reviewing all of these cases can help individuals recall forgotten tidbits of knowledge about common cases we see fairly frequently. Approaching each case as an unknown is not only entertaining, but brings back mostly fond (and some not-so-fond) memories of countless hours of boards preparation.

Each case begins with an image, a brief history, and 4 multiple choice questions about the image. The subsequent page gives the diagnosis, the answer to the questions, and a commentary which varies in format depending on the case. Cross references to The Requisites series rounds out the case, along with acknowledgments where appropriate. The images are good and a section of supplemental images is a nice addition to round out the review of each case.

I continue to highly recommend the Case Review Series, including this book, to residents studying on rotation and preparing for the boards. The …

RadCases: Ultrasound Imaging

Azar N, Donaldson CK. RadCases: Ultrasound Imaging. Thieme; 2015; 224 pp; 460 ill; $59.99

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RadCases: Ultrasound Imaging by Nami Azar and Carolyn K. Donaldson was published by Thieme in 2015 and is part of the RadCases series edited by Jonathan Lorenz and Hector Ferral. This book fits in well with the RadCases series as a case-based review of ultrasound cases, which includes common and unusual diseases and demonstrates how they appear on ultrasound, with supplemental cross-sectional images in some cases. The hardcover includes 100 cases plus a scratch-off code that allows the purchaser to access all 100 cases and an additional 150 cases online for 1 year.

Cases are presented in a random fashion with respect to topic, just as cases may be read in practice. Thus, a gallbladder case may be followed by a thyroid case, then a kidney case, and then a scrotal case. One drawback to this format is that it hinders focused studying of 1 topic area at a time. A benefit is that it is a more realistic format and facilitates the presentation of each case as an unknown. Each case begins with 1 or more ultrasound images and a brief clinical presentation. Further workup images and sometimes cross-sectional images are shown on the same page. When the page is turned, the second page summarizes the imaging findings with an annotated description. A differential diagnosis is given with the correct disease in bold print. A brief section on essential facts and pearls and pitfalls follows. Each of these sections is written in brief bullet points.

The cases are a nice mix of complex and basic cases. Topics are reviewed succinctly but effectively. Image quality is very good and the images are practical, reflecting what might be encountered in clinical practice. There is a nice …

Nerve Surgery

Mackinnon SE. Nerve Surgery. Thieme; 2015; 645 pp; 879 ill; $299.99

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Dr. Susan Mackinnon is a world-renowned expert in all aspects of peripheral nerve injury and repair, from basic science to surgery and clinical treatment to clinical discovery. She has served as Professor and Chair of Plastic Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine for almost two decades.

As an author of more than 500 articles in numerous areas of nerve injury and repair, she is likely best known for her work on the development of nerve allograft repair with immunosuppression, the understanding of tubular nerve repair strategies, and more recently, nerve transfers. She co-authored a book with Lee Dellon in the late 80s on peripheral nerve surgery, and the current textbook, now almost 30 years later, is a much-needed update on and advance in the field.

The book is organized into sections, going from basic science and anatomy and physiology of nerve repair to the concept of nerve grafting. As opposed to the previous text, there is a real focus on nerve transfers, a relatively new area of peripheral nerve surgery. The text is extremely well-organized and of enormous value as a reference text for any practitioner involved in nerve repair.

The neuroradiology aspects of this book are relatively minor and limited—mostly to images of tumors of the peripheral nervous system. The area of imaging of nerve injuries is really a sub-subspecialty within this field of neuroradiology and is essentially not covered in this text.

The text does cover many of the surgical aspects of peripheral nerve repair, including (but not limited to) direct nerve repair, nerve graft, and nerve transfers. It includes entrapment neuropathies as well as tendon transfers for functional recovery.

The images are excellent and clearly labeled. Only a few are taken from the original …