Special Collections

Image Experts

As radiologists we are imaging experts. We instantly assess thousands of pixels and contours — analyzing everything from anatomy to pathology to image quality. Does this expertise in image assessment arm us with a skill set useful not only in evaluating images, but also in creating them?

I recently read a nice article in the journal of Neurosurgery titled “The Art of Medicine”. The author, Dr. Lewis Blevins Jr., shares his clinical experience through artistic expression. He is not alone. The overlap between physicians and artists for most of us begins with a copy of the Atlas of Human Anatomy by Dr. Frank Netter. Many radiologists likewise demonstrate not only an interest in art, but also a talent for it. This year I came across beautiful examples of artistry in radiology that include Dr. Aletta Ann Frazier’s illustrative pieces presented at AIRP as well as Dr. Matt Skalski’s Radiopaedia diagrams and ASNR 2015 Meeting Twitter logo.

I was first introduced to the concept of creating original figures and diagrams in medical school by neuroradiologist Dr. Roy Riascos, and have pursued this art form since. The experience of creating an image that correlates with findings in our patients provides radiologists with an enhanced opportunity for learning. When we are responsible for every bend and curve in an image, we comprehend the underlying anatomy and pathology on a much deeper level.

With the advent of the digital age, the mouse and stylus provide interesting alternatives to the brush and canvas. Illustration programs such as “Inkpad” and “Paper by FiftyThree” are free and easily accessible on the iPad. Vector graphics (digital images comprised not by specific pixels, but by formulas for the lines and curves that make these images) are the new artistic medium. In fact, most of us have …

Special AJNR Supplements Celebrate 50 Years of ASNR History

The American Society of Neuroradiology marks its 50th anniversary in 2012 and the American Journal of Neuroradiology is commemorating this milestone with a series of multimedia tributes. Just released is “History of Neuroradiology: ASNR and AJNR,” a Special Collection edited by Mauricio Castillo, AJNR’s Editor-in-Chief.

“ASNR’s gold anniversary is an occasion to celebrate, recall our history, and stand in awe of those first visionaries who saw the opportunity and need to formally establish the specialty of neuroradiology in the United States and around the world,” observed Castillo. “This collection of almost 90 articles from AJNR and other publications documents what has occurred since the start of neuroradiology up until today. The beauty of its electronic basis is that it will allow new content to be added as years pass.”

Complementing the published history collection is a series of podcasts with ASNR founders and visionaries. AJNR’s Podcast Editor C. Douglas Phillips interviewed these dignitaries and a new podcast will released each month, beginning in April. The first is a reminiscence with Michael Huckman, ASNR Past President and former AJNR Editor-in-Chief. These special podcasts will be posted along with Dr. Phillips’ regular summaries of each issue’s highlights and are available to download from the AJNR Website or the iTunes Store.

A second Special Collection “Top 40 Articles in AJNR,” compiled by Guest Editors Harry J. Cloft and David F. Kallmes will be released later in the month to coincide with ASNR’s Annual Meeting in New York City, the site of its founding. The Journal is also featuring a series of historical Perspectives columns and 50th Anniversary review articles, published in its January, June-July, and December issues.

AJNR’s Special Collections are intended to provide a comprehensive source of imaging-related articles on a single topic and are released …

Pediatric Neuroimaging is Subject of Latest AJNR Special Collection

Congenital Brain Malformations”  is the latest Special Collection from the American Journal of Neuroradiology. Collection Editors Thierry A.G.M. Huisman, a pediatric neuroradiologist, and Andrea Poretti, a pediatric neurologist, at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine collaborated to select articles that chronicle highlights in the development of neuroimaging techniques that have revolutionized the analysis and understanding of multiple congenital brain anomalies over the past decade.

“The number and complexity of recognized congenital brain anomalies have steadily increased and techniques such as fetal MRI allow us not only to refine or correct diagnosis, but also to recognize different phenotypes that may exist within a group of malformations,” said Huisman and Poretti. The articles they included illustrate the improved identification and imaging of malformations that have guided genetic analysis and understanding of the inner neuro-architecture and functional relationships of the developing brain. “This information may help to better categorize various brain malformations that may look similar on conventional imaging but have different etiologies,” they explained.

In an accompanying podcast, Drs. Huisman and Poretti discuss the collection and their multidisciplinary approach to pediatric imaging and diagnosis with AJNR’s Podcast Editor C. Douglas Phillips. This special podcast is posted along with Dr. Phillips’ regular summaries of each issue’s highlights and is available to download from the AJNR Website or the iTunes Store.

AJNR’s Special Collections are intended to provide a comprehensive source of imaging-related articles on a single topic and are released biannually on an open-access basis. Previous Collections include “Imaging Acute Stroke and its Consequences” edited by Pamela W. Schaefer and R. Gilberto González, “Acute Stroke Intervention” edited by Colin P. Derdeyn and Avi Mazumdar, “Percutaneous Vertebroplasty” edited by Mary E. Jensen and Joshua A. Hirsch, “Radiation Dose in Neuroradiology CT Protocols” …

Decade of Advances in Head and Neck Tumor Imaging Reviewed in Latest AJNR Special Collection

Head and Neck Neoplasms” is the new Special Collection from the American Journal of Neuroradiology. Collection Editor Christine M. Glastonbury of the University of California, San Francisco assembled the articles by adopting the perspective of an academic, but predominantly clinical, neuroradiologist. “My bias was toward articles that I have found particularly useful in clinical practice, what I see incorrectly reported at tumor board cases, or that I view as having exciting clinical potential,” she explained.

The collection is arranged in three parts reflecting the core of head and neck imaging: squamous cell carcinoma, other malignant and benign neck neoplasms, and advanced imaging techniques including CT perfusion, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, MR diffusion, and MR spectroscopy. “Over the next decade, these techniques are likely to dramatically influence how we image and treat head and neck tumors,” said Dr. Glastonbury. “All the authors of these articles are giants in head and neck radiology and we owe so much to their contributions to advancing our field. I hope readers enjoy learning and wondering a little more about the future of head and neck imaging.”

In an accompanying podcast, Dr. Glastonbury and AJNR’s Podcast Editor C. Douglas Phillips discuss the challenges in head and neck imaging and the ways in which advanced techniques are fostering the move from diagnosis to prognosis in this realm. This special podcast is posted along with Dr. Phillips’ regular summaries of each issue’s highlights and is available to download from the AJNR Website or the iTunes Store.

AJNR’s Special Collections are intended to provide a comprehensive source of imaging-related articles on a single topic and are released biannually on an open-access basis. Previous Collections include “Imaging Acute Stroke and its Consequences” edited by Pamela W. Schaefer and R. Gilberto González, “Acute Stroke

Radiation Dose in Neuroradiology: New Special Collection and Podcast

By now most Neuroradiologists are aware of the US Food and Drug Administration notification regarding dangerous levels of radiation exposure produced in one facility while performing CT perfusion. This unfortunate event has been front page material for the media, leading to patient anxiety and, more important, to questions regarding the use of this valuable technique. The facility involved has recently revealed that  260 patients were exposed to high radiation levels; 20% of cases involving the eyes which places these individuals at high risk for cataracts. It should come as no surprise that by the time of this writing, legal action against that facility and the equipment manufacturer have been initiated. Shortly thereafter, in a different facility, a technologist scanned the same region of a child’s head 151 times! Because radiation exposure from diagnostic tests has received considerable notice—even before these 2 incidents—it behooves all of us to employ our equipment judiciously.  In many instances, the benefits far outweigh the risks of radiation exposure.

In a timely fashion that only electronic publication allows, Drs. Max Wintermark and Mike Lev, experts on CT perfusion, have put together a wonderful editorial (to appear in the print edition of AJNR, too) and an informative Special Collection on radiation exposure-related articles. Our series of Special Collections is biannual but when we believe that our readers and society constituency need further information, we can rapidly act and deploy educational materials that will keep us all well versed and up-to-date.

Additionally at www.ajnr.org you will be able to find our first podcast.  Our podcast editor is Dr. Doug Phillips from Cornell University.  This podcast is a group discussion regarding radiation exposure and CT scanning.  The group participants are Drs. Wintermark, Lev, Schaefer and Sanelli all experts in this field.  Before this podcast was recorded I invited …

AJNR’s New Special Collection Provides Backdrop to Vertebroplasty Controversy

The recent publication of two prospective, randomized vertebroplasty trials in the New England Journal of Medicine has garnered lively debate about the benefits of this procedure. The American Journal of Neuroradiology’s latest Special Collection “Percutaneous Vertebroplasty” documents the seminal research leading up to these latest studies and serves as an excellent foundation for spinal augmentation research.

“Few would argue that percutaneous vertebroplasty announced its birth and found its voice on the pages of AJNR. No other publication has been more crucial to the discussion, dissection, and dissemination of technical and clinical research as it relates to this procedure,said Collection editors Mary E. Jensen and Joshua A. Hirsch. “The sheer number of positive outcomes in patients debilitated by their disease, catalogued on these pages stand as testimony to the benefits of vertebroplasty over best medical therapy.”

“Little did all of us know that destiny would ‘throw us a curve ball’ on August 6 when the New England Journal published the now famous (or infamous?) articles that attempted to debunk vertebroplasty as treatment for painful osteoporotic spinal fractures,” explained AJNR’s Editor-in-Chief Mauricio Castillo. “These events make this compilation of articles even more pertinent. Now is the time for the reader to decide if the procedure is beneficial or not, and to act accordingly.”

AJNR Special Collections are released biannually on an open-access basis to provide a comprehensive source of imaging-related articles that are convenient, valuable, and quotable. Previous Collections include “Imaging Acute Stroke and its Consequences,” edited by Pamela W. Schaefer and R. Gilberto González, and “Acute Stroke Intervention” edited by Colin P. Derdeyn and Avi Mazumdar. All are available through AJNR’s print-on-demand service (Brightdoc), allowing readers to order a full-color hard copy for just US $50.00, plus shipping.

Be …

AJNR Special Collections now available in print!

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We now have print on demand capabilities. After our first Special Collection was published online about 6 months ago we received several requests from individuals wanting print copies of it. Now, on the welcome page of each collection users will find a link that takes them to this exclusive service.  For $50.00 US you can order a printed issue of all of the contents in each collection.  The printed issue arrives in few days later by mail and has a nice glossy cover (similar to AJNR).  The cover design changes with each issue.  This a great opportunity to have in your hands these fantastic collections of the ANJRs best articles.…

Special Collections Issues

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Our first special collection issue, edited by Dr. Schaefer and Gonzalez from the MGH has been a success. You can look at it by clicking the right hand column on our website.  We continue with this service and our second issue is currently being prepared.  The editor will be Dr. Colin Derdeyn from the Mallinckrodt Institute.  Its topic is arterial and venous recanalization which I think will nicely complement the first issue which was on imaging of stroke and its consequences.  We have it planned for April of this year so come back and visit our website often!  Special collections issues will continue to be published twice per year.…