Interventional Oncology: Principles and Practice of Image-Guided Cancer Therapy, 2nd Edition

Geschwind J-F, Soulen MC, eds. Interventional Oncology: Principles and Practice of Image-Guided Cancer Therapy. 2nd ed. Cambridge Medicine; 2016; 346 pp; 94 ill; $199.00

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Interventional oncology (IO) is a rapidly advancing and ever-changing field. So important has IO become in the treatment of patients with cancer that it is the fourth pillar of cancer care, with the traditional 3 being surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.1 Diagnostic and interventional radiologists both play important roles in the clinical evaluation of patients and participate in multidisciplinary tumor boards. Participation in these boards is a must for the diagnostic and interventional radiologist alike. It is no longer sufficient for radiologist to merely show images and perform anatomic measurements of tumor response; rather, a thorough understanding of the disease process and multidisciplinary therapeutic options is required to add true value to the discussion.

Traditionally, IO has been thought of in the narrow scope of liver-directed therapy, such as that for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver-predominant colorectal metastases. Now, IO encompasses bone ablation, prostate ablation, treatment of lung cancer, primary and adjunctive treatment of renal cell carcinoma, and a host of palliative care procedures.

This book showcases the breadth of pathology and the wide-ranging tools that interventional radiology and IO have at their disposal to treat patients with cancer. Specialists from around the world have contributed and authors are the definitive authorities on their topics (e.g., Riccardo Lencioni authors the chapter on the assessment and triage of hepatocellular carcinoma, and Peter Mueller and Debra Gervais author the chapter on the management of small renal masses).

Organized into a total of 10 sections, this book first discusses principles behind therapies (e.g., how Y-90 or radiofrequency ablation works) and then discusses specific modalities for the treatment of specific diseases (e.g., Y-90 for colorectal liver metastases and ablation …

Neurosurgical Operative Atlas: Spine and Peripheral Nerves, 3rd Edition

Wolfla CE, Resnick DK. Neurosurgical Operative Atlas: Spine and Peripheral Nerves. 3rd ed. Thieme; 2016; 546 pp; 874 ill; $269.99

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Neurosurgical Operative Atlas is a comprehensive tutorial on current spinal and peripheral nerve surgery written by a group of authors mainly from the world of neurosurgery. The sections covering surgery of the spine give a comprehensive overview of topics such as decompression, instrumentation, and fusion. Further specialty topics such as tumor excisions and vascular malformations are also covered. The section on peripheral nerves mainly covers surgical treatment of upper and lower extremity nerve compression syndromes, as well as treatments of brachial plexus injuries.

The organizational structure, teaching value, and accuracy of the information presented is a strength of this book. Each chapter is organized into sections discussing indications for treatment, patient selection, treatment options, and preoperative planning for various procedures. The subjects are comprehensively covered without getting mired in the minutiae of various pathologies and concepts. It can serve as both a reference and a primary guide for reviewing operative techniques; hence, as a teaching text, it is quite useful. The accuracy of the information presented is as expected for a textbook published with the support of a reputable organization such as the American Association for Neurological Surgeons. The references cited in every chapter are invariably from peer-reviewed journals and leading textbooks in the various disciplines of surgery covered.

The images and illustrations presented in this text are of excellent quality. The illustrations are not always as visually appealing as those that can be found in other texts, but they serve as a strong supplement to the written portions. The greatest strength of this book, however, is the generally outstanding series of intraoperative images provided. The editors and authors have managed to acquire images of great quality, which is …

Vahe Zohrabian Selected as AJNR’s Next Editorial Fellow

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Vahe Zohrabian

The AJNR is pleased to announce Vahe Zohrabian, M.D. as our fifth Editorial Fellow.

Dr. Zohrabian graduated from Columbia University with a degree in Biological Sciences and Sociology, and then attended New York Medical College. He completed his residency in Diagnostic Radiology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, and then his fellowship at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Zohrabian has authored 7 peer-reviewed manuscripts and 9 book chapters. He has given numerous lectures at both regional and national meetings and was the recipient of the Outstanding Presentation Award in Spine Radiology at the ASNR meeting in 2011 for “Application of Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a Surrogate for Neurologic Deficit in Spinal Cord Injury.”

During his Editorial Fellowship, he will participate in all AJNR activities including, but not limited to, manuscript evaluation and selection, editorial-related research, and conferences. The AJNR family is very pleased to welcome Dr. Zohrabian.…

Effects of MRI Protocol Parameters, Preload Injection Dose, Fractionation Strategies, and Leakage Correction Algorithms on the Fidelity of Dynamic-Susceptibility Contrast MRI Estimates of Relative Cerebral Blood Volume in Gliomas

Fellows’ Journal Club

The authors used DSC-MR imaging simulations to examine the influence of various acquisition parameters and leakage-correction strategies on the faithful estimation of CBV. Optimal strategies were determined by protocol with the lowest mean error. They conclude that the choice of image acquisition and preload dosing and/or fractionation has tremendous impact on the fidelity of CBV estimation. A variety of acquisition strategies can be used to obtain similar accuracy of CBV estimation, while the bidirectional leakage-correction algorithm aids in minimizing errors in CBV estimation under all scenarios.

Evaluation of Encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis Efficacy Using Probabilistic Independent Component Analysis Applied to Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI

Editor’s Choice

In this prospective study, 13 patients underwent unilateral indirect cerebral revascularization and DSC-MR imaging before and after surgery. Conventional perfusion parameters (relative CBV, relative CBF, and TTP) and probabilistic independent components that reflect the relative contributions of DSC signals consistent with arterial, capillary, and venous hemodynamics were calculated and examined for significant changes after surgery. Before surgery, tissue within the affected hemisphere demonstrated a high probability for hemodynamics consistent with venous flow and a low probability for hemodynamics consistent with arterial flow, whereas the contralateral control hemisphere demonstrated the reverse. Consistent with symptomatic improvement, the probability for venous hemodynamics within the affected hemisphere decreased with time after surgery. The authors conclude that probabilistic independent component analysis yielded sensitive measurements of changes in local tissue perfusion that may be associated with newly formed vasculature after indirect cerebral revascularization surgery.

Noninterpretive Skills in Radiology: Q&A Top Score Prep Guide for the Boards

Weissman AF, Bartel TB. Noninterpretive Skills in Radiology: Q&A Top Score Prep Guide for the Boards. Thieme; 2016; 110 pp; 25 ill; $39.99

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Familiarity with many of the issues raised in this succinct, softcover book entitled Noninterpretive Skills in Radiology is germane not only for those tested by the ABR, but also for those involved in any of the administrative aspects of hospital and clinical practice. While the ABR does disseminate material deemed to be useful in preparation for their examinations, it provides less of a study guide than this publication, which all radiologists will find useful.

After a 28-page introduction to noninterpretive skills, the remaining 54 pages are set up in a question and answer manner in which multiple choice questions are asked and immediately following are short, well-written answers and appropriate references.

Many important items are covered in the material, including (but not limited to) quality improvement, metrics used in assessing value and productivity, safety, errors, RCA, contrast allergies and nephropathy, statistics, professionalism, and more. Among all of this material are embedded buzzwords, such as the “Hawthorne effect” or the “Swiss cheese model,” of which we have little understanding. Within each section are excellent graphics, cartoons, and medical images which help to solidify each discussion point. The 175 questions cover most material with which one would be expected to be familiar.

This straightforward book should be of interest to all those in radiology, but should be particularly valuable to those anticipating sitting for the ABR exam. It is a recommended purchase for all departments and could be a good addition to one’s personal library.…

Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis, 2nd Edition

Federle MP, Rosado-de-Christenson ML, Raman SP, Carter BW, Woodward PJ, Shaaban AM. Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis. 2nd ed. Elsevier; 2016; 1192 pp; $329.99

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For anyone predominantly or exclusively involved in neuroradiology, having a high-quality, well-illustrated, and readily available text covering the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is desirable. Those parts of the body have a nasty way of occasionally making the interpretations of spine imaging more difficult. Enter the second edition of Imaging Anatomy: Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis (2017), published by Elsevier and edited by Drs. Federle, Rosado-de-Christenson, Raman, Carter, Woodward, and Shaaban. As with all the books in this series, the drawings, the imaging, and the bullet point written material in this hardcover book is outstanding in quality.

The chest section is divided into 16 chapters, the abdomen into 17 chapters, and the pelvis into 8 chapters. The emphasis throughout, as the title implies, is on anatomy; however, in some sections (e.g., in the abdomen) there is more pathologic imaging than in others. Nearly all of the material is pertinent to our interpretation of spine imaging when large fields of view are included (or even if the FOVs are narrow). Nowhere is this more pertinent than when viewing thoracic lumbar spine imaging (CTs in particular) and analyzing the abdominal contents when required. Here would be a ready reference to help resolve questions related to anatomy and pathology incidentally seen on neuroimaging. The same can be said for the imaging of the pelvis. Here (as in the entire book) the illustrations of the anatomy are outstanding. These help to further one’s appreciation of the accompanying CT anatomy, although MR and US are included to a lesser extent. There are areas that will not be troublesome when viewing spine or lumbosacral plexus studies, such as detailed imaging anatomy of the heart …

Transverse Sinus Stenosis Is the Most Sensitive MR Imaging Correlate of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

Fellows’ Journal Club

MR imaging and MRV images from 63 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and 96 controls were reviewed by using 3 independent procedures. MRV images were graded for the presence and degree of stenosis of the transverse sinus. Postgadolinium coronal T1-weighted sequences were evaluated independent of MRV. The dimensions of the proximal and distal transverse sinus were measured. Transverse sinus stenosis was identified bilaterally on MRV in 94% of patients with IIH and in 3% of controls. On coronal T1 postgadolinium MR images, transverse sinus stenosis was identified in 83% of patients with IIH and 7% of controls. The authors conclude that transverse sinus stenosis is the most useful and sensitive imaging indicator of this disease state.

Hydrogel versus Bare Platinum Coils in Patients with Large or Recurrent Aneurysms Prone to Recurrence after Endovascular Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Editor’s Choice

This Level 1 expedited report was a pragmatic, multicenter, parallel, randomized (1:1) trial evaluating patients who were at high risk of aneurysm recurrence after endovascular treatment, including patients with large aneurysms (Patients Prone to Recurrence After Endovascular Treatment PRET-1) or with aneurysms that had previously recurred after coiling (PRET-2). The trial was stopped once 250 patients in PRET-1 and 197 in PRET-2 had been recruited because of slow accrual. A poor primary outcome occurred in 44.4% of those in PRET-1 allocated to platinum compared with 52.5% of patients allocated to hydrogel and in 49.0% in PRET-2 allocated to platinum compared with 42.1% allocated to hydrogel. Adverse events and morbidity were similar. The authors conclude that coiling of large and recurrent aneurysms is safe but often poorly effective according to angiographic results. Hydrogel coiling was not shown to be better than platinum.

Neuroimaging Clinics of North America: Pediatric Brain Tumors Update

Brandão LA, ed. Mukherji SK, consulting ed. Neuroimaging Clinics of North America: Pediatric Brain Tumors Update. Elsevier; 2017;27(1):1–194; $365.00

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As a follow-up to the last issue (November 2016) of the Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, which dealt with adult brain tumors, the current issue, also edited by Dr. Lara Brandão, concerns an update on pediatric brain tumors. One hundred and ninety-four pages in length, the material covers not only standard imaging/findings in pediatric tumors, but also importantly includes advanced techniques both in the initial patient assessment and in posttherapy evaluation. The nine chapters of this issue are: posterior fossa tumors; supratentorial tumors; neonatal brain tumors; pineal region masses; sella and the parasellar region rumors; extraparenchymal lesions; tumors and tumor-like masses that involve multiple spaces; peptide-based vaccine therapies; and advanced MR imaging/clinical applications. For the seasoned neuroradiologist, the last two chapters will be of greatest interest; however, the entire volume addresses key imaging points in a wide spectrum of neoplastic brain disorders. Dr. Brandão has done a remarkable job (similar to the editorship of the prior volume) getting the 24 authors to contribute their experiences and expertise to this important issue. If one is not a Neuroimaging Clinics of North America subscriber, then this single issue is a recommended purchase for one’s personal collection or for a departmental library.…