synthetic MRI

Synthetic MRI for Clinical Neuroimaging: Results of the Magnetic Resonance Image Compilation (MAGiC) Prospective, Multicenter, Multireader Trial

Editor’s Choice

The authors performed a prospective multireader, multicase noninferiority trial of 1526 images read by 7 blinded neuroradiologists with prospectively acquired synthetic and conventional brain MR imaging case-control pairs from 109 subjects with neuroimaging indications. Each case included conventional T1- and T2-weighted, T1 and T2 FLAIR, and STIR and/or proton density and synthetic reconstructions from multiple-dynamic multiple-echo imaging. Images were randomized and independently assessed. Overall synthetic MR imaging quality was similar to that of conventional proton-density, STIR, and T1- and T2-weighted contrast views across neurologic conditions. Artifacts were more common in synthetic T2 FLAIR, but were readily recognizable and did not mimic pathology.

Clinical Feasibility of Synthetic MRI in Multiple Sclerosis: A Diagnostic and Volumetric Validation Study

Editor’s Choice

SyMRI is a quantitative synthetic MR imaging method where a single saturation recovery TSE sequence is used to estimate the proton density, longitudinal relaxation rate, and transverse relaxation rate and allows for a free range of synthetic weightings. Twenty patients with MS and 20 healthy controls were enrolled and synthetic MR imaging was implemented on a Siemens 3T scanner. Diagnostic accuracy, lesion detection, and artifacts were assessed by blinded neuroradiologic evaluation, and CNR by manual tracing. Synthetic PD-, T1-, and T2-weighted images were of sufficient or good quality and were acquired in 7% less time than with conventional MRI. Synthetic FLAIR images suffered from artifacts. Also, synthetic MRI provided segmentations with the shortest processing time (16 seconds) and the lowest repeatability error for brain volume. Synthetic MRI can be an alternative to conventional MRI for generating diagnostic PD-, T1-, and T2-weighted images in patients with MS with fast and robust volumetric measurements.

Abstract

Conventional (top row) and synthetic (middle row) axial noncontrast MR imaging in a 49-year-old male patient with MS, from left to right: T1-, PD-, and T2-weighted, and FLAIR images. The bottom row shows brain tissue segmentations of the WM (cyan), GM (green), CSF (magenta), and other remaining brain tissues (yellow) from SyMRI.
Conventional (top row) and synthetic (middle row) axial noncontrast MR imaging in a 49-year-old male patient with MS, from left to right: T1-, PD-, and T2-weighted, and FLAIR images. The bottom row shows brain tissue segmentations of the WM (cyan), GM (green), CSF (magenta), and other remaining brain tissues (yellow) from SyMRI.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Quantitative MR imaging techniques are gaining interest as methods of reducing acquisition times while additionally providing robust measurements. This study aimed to implement a synthetic MR imaging method on a new scanner type and to compare its diagnostic accuracy and volumetry with conventional MR imaging in patients with MS and controls.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Twenty patients with MS and 20 healthy controls were enrolled after ethics approval and written informed consent. Synthetic MR imaging was implemented on a Siemens 3T scanner. Comparable conventional and synthetic proton-density–, T1-, and T2-weighted, and